Fort Meade Young Marines
Strengthing the Lives of America's Youth

Fire Escape Planning

This page is from Ft.Meade
Learning Objectives:

 

  1. Identify what to do in the event of a home fire.
  2. Identify the importance of a home fire escape plan.

Materials:

Background:

Activity:

1. Ask students if they have ever wondered what they would do if there was a fire in their home. Stress that it's important to get out fast.

  • They should never hide or take time to gather up their toys or other belongings.
  • Fires are scary and confusing.
  • They can be loud, burn very fast and their smoke can make a room or home very dark.
  • It helps to have a plan to know what to do if there is a fire and to get out fast.

2. Ask students if they know what a home fire escape plan is. Be sure to stress the importance of planning for two ways out in case one means of egress is blocked by fire.

3. Ask students why they think a home fire escape plan is important.

  • Students will probably conclude that home fire escape plans help them to get out quickly and safely in the event of fire.

4. Ask students if they have a home fire escape plan and if they practice it regularly with an adult.

5. Escape Maze. Ask students to find two ways out of the escape maze.

  • Remind them that just like the maze, good home fire escape plans have two ways out.

6. Escape Plan Diagrams.

 

  • Using the small space, ask students to draw a picture of their bedroom.
  • Have them mark where the doors and windows are, and then make an escape plan by drawing arrows to show two ways out. Remind students that the first way out should be a door.
  • Using the large space, ask students to draw their home, showing the location of windows and doors they can use to escape. Remind students that every way needs to be planned and practiced with an adult.

7. Review the fire escape plans with the class, emphasizing the following fire safety tips:

  • Before opening any door in a fire, feel it first. If it is hot, there may be fire on the other side. Try to get out another way.
  • Crawl low on the floor to avoid heat and smoke.
  • Pick a safe and easy-to-remember place outside the home to meet the rest of the family.
  • Call 9-1-1 after escaping from the fire.
  • Stay outside no matter what; don't go back for anything.
  • Conclude the lesson by asking students to practice their home fire escape plans with an adult when they go home.

Home Fire Escape Drill (for parents).

Using the escape plan diagrams in #6 above, ask your child to lead you out of their bedroom and then your home, practicing both ways out of each. To simulate escaping from a fire-like environment, have your child practice escaping from his/her bedroom with eyes closed. As you practice the plan, reinforce the following safety tips along the way:

  • Crawl low to avoid heat and smoke.
  • Feel doors with the back of your hand before opening them. Do not open the door if it feels hot - use your second exit get out fast.
  • Meet outside and then call 911 for help.
  • Stay outside no matter what - don't go back for anything.
more information can be found at the U.S. Fire Administration

Fire Safety

Smoke Alarms

This page is from Ft.Meade
Learning Objectives:
  1. Identify the purpose of smoke alarms.
  2. Identify where smoke alarms should be installed.
  3. Identify how to keep smoke alarms in working order.

Materials: Smoke alarm, batteries

Background:

Procedure:

1. Ask students if they know what smoke alarms are and why they should have them in their homes.

  • Smoke alarms help protect families by making a very loud beeping noise to warn that smoke is in the air or a fire has started.
  • Sometimes, especially at night when people are sleeping, they may not see fire, smell smoke or wake up in time to get out safely.
  • Smoke alarms provide an early warning signal for escape from fire.

2. Demonstrate what a smoke alarm looks like and the sound it makes when it detects smoke.

3. Ask students what they should do if they hear a smoke alarm sound.

 

  • They need to follow their home fire escape plan and get out fast.

4. Ask students if they know where smoke alarms should be installed.

  • Smoke alarms should be installed on every level of the home, including the basement.
  • For extra safety, install smoke alarms both inside and outside the sleeping area.
  • Smoke alarms should be installed on the ceiling or on the side walls 6 to 8 inches below the ceiling.

5. Ask students how often they think the batteries in smoke alarms should be changed.

 

  • Batteries should be changed at least once a year and tested monthly to make sure they are working.

6. Show students where the batteries go in a smoke alarm. Press the test button to demonstrate it is working properly. Also, remind students that alarms need to be kept clean from dust. This can be done by running a vacuum cleaner attachment over and around them.

7. Conclude the lesson by telling students they can keep their homes safe from fire by helping grown-ups remember to:

  • put smoke alarms in the home, especially near bedrooms
  • test smoke alarms monthly to make sure they are working
  • replace with brand new batteries at least once a year
  • keep smoke alarms clean from dust

Smoke Alarm Safety Check (for parents).

Smoke alarms are very easy to install and take care of. To help teach your children about smoke alarms, ask them to help you install and maintain them.

  • Install smoke alarms on every level of your home, including the basement.
  • Many fatal fires begin late at night or in the early morning. For extra safety, install smoke alarms both inside and outside the sleeping area.
  • Also, smoke alarms should be installed on the ceiling or 6 to 8 inches below the ceiling on side walls. Since smoke and many deadly gases rise, installing your smoke alarms at the proper level will provide you with the earliest warning possible.
  • Always follow the manufacturer's installation instructions.
  • Each month, ask your child to help you test all of the alarms in the home. This would also be a good time to make sure your alarms are clean and free of dust.
  • Ask your child to pick at least one special day a year, like a birthday, holiday or other special event. Designate that day as "Smoke Alarm Safety Day" and replace all of the batteries in your smoke alarms with new ones. If your home has "hard-wired" alarms (connected to the household electrical system), they may or may not have battery back-up.
more information can be found at the U.S. Fire Administration
 
Home Fire Safety

This page is from Ft.Meade
Learning Objectives:

 

  1. Identify fire hazards in the home.
  2. Learn the importance of correcting home fire safety hazards.

Materials: Drawings of three different rooms in a home: a kitchen, living room, and bedroom

Background:

Classroom Activity

1. Ask students if they know what fire hazards are and if they can name things in the home that might be considered a fire hazard.

 

    Students will probably identify some of the following:

     

  • frayed cords on electrical appliances
  • electrical cords run underneath carpets or furniture
  • matches and lighters placed where kids can reach them
  • fireplaces without mesh screens
  • paper, fabric, trash, or other combustible materials left too close to heat sources such as furnaces, hot water heaters, fireplaces, wood stoves, etc..
  • material draped over lamps
  • curtains located too close to the bulbs in torch-style halogen lamps
  • pot holders or kitchen towels stored too close to stoves
  • electrical equipment left on with no one is in the room
  • smoking in bed

Explain that these are dangerous things that could be in anyone's home.

2. Ask students if they know why it is important to identify and correct fire hazards in the home.

Students will probably conclude it is important in order to prevent a fire in the home and to prevent their families from being hurt in a fire. Stress that some hazards may not seem dangerous, such as overloaded extension cords, but that they could cause a fire when they least expect it. Fire hazards are especially dangerous at night, when no one is awake to notice that a fire has started.

3. Review the three rooms in the drawings. Identify the fire hazards that are found in these rooms. At a minimum, the students should identify:

 

    In the kitchen:

     

  • towel too close to the stove top
  • child cooking alone
  • pot handle turned in the wrong direction - it should be turned to the center of the stove to prevent burns
  • smoke alarm battery missing in hallway

    In the living room:

     

  • overloaded electrical outlet
  • candle too close to upholstered materials and left unattended
  • T.V. left on and unattended
  • mesh screen missing from in front of the fireplace
  • newspapers left too close to the fireplace where a spark could ignite them
  • smoke alarm battery missing

    In the bedroom:

     

  • clothing draped over lamp where it could start to burn
  • an object (duck) placed on a space heater where it could start to burn
  • space heater left on when no one is in the room
  • clothing left too close to the space heater where it could catch fire
  • smoke alarm battery missing

4. OPTIONAL: Instruct students to draw a home floor plan and inspect their own homes with their parents.

Have students identify the fire hazards they found in each room. Students should also be able to explain what their parents did to correct the fire hazard. It is important that the students not touch electrical cords or electrical equipment, for example, themselves - a parent or another adult should make the necessary changes.

Home Fire Safety Drill for Parents

Accompany your child from room to room in your home, looking for possible safety hazards. When the child identifies one, talk about why it could be a hazard, and what can be done to correct it. Emphasize with your child that if they see fire hazards, they should tell you - children should not try to correct them themselves. Electricity and fire can be dangerous things, and children should ask adults to manipulate electrical cords, electrical equipment, etc.

more information can be found at the U.S. Fire Administration